Album Review: Wilsen – I Go Missing In My Sleep

Having released EP’s Sirens and Magnolia, New York’s Wilsen have now produced their long-awaited debut album I Go Missing In My Sleep, a title that is quite apt given that their sound has been dubbed as ‘dream folk’.

Further comparisons have been made with that of Daughter, whilst lead woman Tamsin Wilson’s vocals are on the side of Lana Del Rey. The latter is especially apparent with opening track Centipede, as Wilson sings of how she ‘envies how you move, those hundred little legs.’ Wilson also states that a lot of inspiration for the album came from the ‘fleeting predawn moments’ of New York City and this is present through the fast plucks of the electric guitar and the drumming of Garden, as the arrangements dip and swell – a perfect ingredient of Wilsen’s work. Kitsilano is a warm-feeling track that features little vocal sound bites in the background. It’s a simple yet complex track that helps showcase Wilsen in the first three songs of this album.

I finally got to listen to this album fully uninterrupted on a long coach journey passing through the English countryside and I have not felt at peace like this for a long time. There are many songs that can take me away from it all but I Go Missing In My Sleep allowed me to go missing when I was awake. The 50-second instrumental of Light Between The Leaves is beautiful and one can can only wish that it was longer. Tamsin Wilson also has a way with making things so dark translate into something so beautiful as she sings, ‘now he’s coughing crimson on the floor,’ in Emperor.

Along with Drew Arndt and Johnny Simon, Wilson has brought together songs from EPs as early as 2013, with stunning fresh material, to bring us Wilsen’s delicate compositions on every single track. From the awakenings of Centipede to the climatic and heart-beating final track I Told You, I Go Missing In My Sleep is a masterpiece of a debut album.

Victoria Ling