Album Review: Houndmouth – Little Neon Limelight

houndmouth_-_cover_-_600

4

Houndmouth, an alternative country band from New Albany, will release their beautiful second album Little Neon Limelight on March 17th. This album shows them at the peak of their career, with songs that really show their growth as a band and brings something new to music.

The album opens with Sedona – an excellent track portraying the depth of their lyrics alongside the exceptional instrumentals. The choral effects show for good production on the album, without the lead vocals being drowned out and the backing vocals only adding to this atmospherical effect.

The fourth track on this album is the heartbreaking and intense ballad For No One. This song uses just an acoustic guitar the whole way through with Matt Myers leading the vocals. The lyrics themselves are full of emotion telling a story going in all turns of direction, ‘Hey that’s a trip/ Why don’t you wait a little bit for the acid to kick in/ Learn to love/ That’ll come down, it’ll spread you so thin’. Houndmouth have used an exceptional way to create such a devastating story. By using the vocals in such a powerful way, juxtaposed with the simplistic and alluring idea of just using basic chords, this produces a song you will be astounded by.

Other standout tracks on this album are Otis, Black Gold, and Gasoline. Gasoline allows us to hear Katie Toupin’s perfect voice in all its glory. This song almost shows off the vintage tone to Katie’s voice and the backing vocals from the rest of the band add a bit more power and definition itself to the track.

What is apparent throughout this album is the crossover from many genres. You hear them try out rock, blues, country and folk. This shows how talented they are as a band and how much progression they have made from their first album From the Hills Below The City. As a band their voices combine in the most effortless and luxurious of ways, making their music easy to listen to and hold a great deal of depth. The record itself doesn’t necessarily work as an album due to the range of genres provided all at once, but realistically this allows them to really branch out and show they’re good at covering multiple genres – something many artists and bands lack nowadays.

Rachel Allman